Courses listed by degree requirements

PSY courses sorted by Neuroscience Degree Requirements

PSY courses required to earn the Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience are listed below. Only courses taught recently on the Bloomington campus appear.

While we've made efforts to ensure the accuracy of the requirements described below, the official source of information is the College of Arts & Sciences Bulletin.

Descriptions of all PSY courses - College of Arts & Sciences Bulletin 2017-2018

  • Introductory Psychology

    Neuroscience majors must complete PSY-P 155 or PSY-P 101 or PSY-P 106.

    • PSY-P 155 Introduction to Psychological and Brain Sciences (3 cr.) CASE N&M.
      An introduction to psychological and brain sciences for psychology majors. Introduces students to the history of psychology and its place in science, to the experimental method, and to the broad range of topics studied by psychological scientists. Credit given for only one of P101, P106, or P155.
    • PSY-P 101 Introductory Psychology I (3 cr.) CASE N&M.
      Introduction to psychology; its methods, data, and theoretical interpretations in areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psychophysiology. Equivalent to IUPUI B105. Credit given for only one of P101, P106, or P155.
  • Neuroscience

    Neuroscience majors must complete PSY-P 346 (or P326).

    PSY-P 346 Neuroscience (3 cr.). 
    P: P155 or P101 or P106 or P151 or equivalent. A survey of contemporary neuroscience, examining the neural basis of behavior with approaches including molecular, cellular, developmental, cognitive, and behavioral neuroscience. Sensory and motor function, learning and memory, and other behaviors are considered using anatomical, physiological, behavioral, biochemical, and genetic approaches, providing a balanced view of neuroscience. Credit given for only one of P346 or P326.

  • Statistics

    Neuroscience majors must complete PSY-K 300 or K310 or a substitute approved by the undergraduate advisor.

    • PSY-K 300 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) CASE N&M
      P: MATH M118 or M119. Introduction to statistics; nature of statistical data; ordering and manipulation of data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; elementary probability. Concepts of statistical inference and decision: estimation and hypothesis testing. Special topics include regression and correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods.
    • PSY-K 310 Statistical Techniques (3 cr.) CASE N&M
      P: MATH M119 or equivalent. Introduction to probability and statistics; elementary probability theory, conditional probability, independence, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Covers concepts of statistical inference and decision; estimation and hypothesis testing; Bayesian inference; and statistical decision theory. Special topics include regression and correlation, time series, analysis of variance, non-parametric methods.
  • Readings & Research

    Research in PBS focuses on the topics and challenges that attract students to majors in psychology and neuroscience. Explore Research Opportunities to find a lab and learn how to apply and enroll.

    Students typically enroll in one to two semesters of Supervised Research before they are eligible to enroll in Capstone Supervised Research. Completing Capstone Supervised Research can fulfill an important degree requirement for neuroscience majors - it can serve as a Neuroscience Lab class if the student enrolls in an approved neuroscience lab. The faculty member with whom you work will determine the appropriate course number.

    • PSY-X 397 Supervised Research I (1-6 cr.). 
      P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; K300 or K310. First in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Does not count toward Capstone or Neuroscience lab credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. 

    • PSY-X 398 Supervised Research II (1-6 cr.).
      P: PSY-X 397. Second in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Does not count toward Capstone or Neuroscience lab credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. 

    • PSY-X 491 Readings in Psychology (1-3 cr.) 
      P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; written consent of instructor; junior or senior standing. Does not count toward Capstone or advanced credit. Not repeatable for credit. Credit given for only one of X491 or P495. 
    • PSY-X 497 Supervised Research III (1-6 cr.). 
      P: X398 or all of the following: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; K300 or K310. Third in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Does not count toward Capstone or Neuroscience lab credit. An independent experiment of modest magnitude. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in X497 and P493. 
    • PSY-X 498 Capstone Supervised Research (2-3 cr.). 
      P: X497 or P493 and permission of supervising instructor. R: PSY-X397 or PSY-X398. The capstone experience in a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Course requires a research plan and progress reports. Counts toward Capstone credit or Neuroscience lab credit in approved labs. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in X498 and P494. I Sem., II Sem.

    • PSY-P 499 Honors Thesis Research (1-12 cr.; max. 12 cr.). 
      P: Approval of departmental honors committee. May be substituted for advanced laboratory requirement or, given the permission of the departmental honors committee, for certain other requirements in the program for majors. See Honors Degree
  • Advanced Neuroscience Courses
    Neuroscience majors must complete four advanced neuroscience courses:
    • PSY-P 337 Clinical Neuroscience (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. Psychological disorders such as depression and autism exact a huge toll in human suffering and social costs. This course surveys the role of disturbed neural mechanisms on the development of psychological disorders. Methods for investigating the relationship between a disorder and proposed mechanisms will be critically evaluated.
    • PSY-P 349 Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. An overview of the field of cognitive neuroscience. The neural basis of cognition is studied by considering the impact of neuropsychological case studies, neuroimaging (ERP and fMRI), and behavioral investigations on our understanding of sensory-motor systems, learning, memory, emotion, and spatial behavior.
    • PSY-P 406 Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (3 cr.).
      P: P346. Provides an overview of the field of developmental cognitive neuroscience, the study of the relation among human brain function, development, and behavior. Critically examines recent research that applies an integration of neurobiological and psychological perspectives to the study of typical and atypical cognitive development.
    • PSY-P 407 Drugs and the Nervous System (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. Introduction to the major psychoactive drugs and how they act upon the brain to influence behavior. Discussion of the role of drugs as therapeutic agents for various clinical disorders and as probes to provide insight into brain function.
    • PSY-P 409 Neural Bases of Sensory Function (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. Detailed description of the neural systems responsible for vision, touch, hearing, taste, smell, and balance. Similarities and differences in the strategies employed by these systems will be stressed.
    • PSY-P 410 Development of the Brain and Behavior (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. Examination of the interaction of the developing brain with the behavior it mediates. Cellular systems and organismal levels of analysis will all be considered in the organization of structure function relationships in the neural basis of behavior.
    • PSY-P 411 Neural Bases of Learning and Memory (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. Comprehensive survey of theories and data concerned with neural correlates of associative and non-associative forms of learning and memory. Vertebrate and invertebrate model systems and preparations as well as data obtained from the human neuropsychology literature will be studied.
    • PSY-P 423 Human Neuropsychology (3 cr.). P: P326 or P346 or equivalent. A critical examination of neurological functioning with respect to human and other animal behavior. Assesses the behavioral functions of neural structures and systems through understanding the behavioral consequences of brain damage and through basic experimental study.
    • PSY-P 437 Neurobiology of Addictions (3 cr.).
      CASE N&M P: P101 or P106 or P155, and P346, and two biology courses (e.g., L112, L211). (Concurrent enrollment in P346 and biology courses only with permission of the instructor.) Provides an in-depth look at the neurobiological bases of addictions, from the cellular, molecular, and systems neuroscience levels of analysis.
    • PSY-P 441 Neuropsychology of Language (3 cr.)
      P: P346 or P335 or P326. Introduction to the neuroscience of language comprehension, including the basic neuroanatomy of the language system and levels of processing from single word to discourse level. Discussion of such language disorders as dyslexia and aphasia.
    • PSY-P 453 Decision-making and the Brain (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P335 or P346. An exploration of how individuals make decisions and what different parts of the brain contribute to decision-making. Focuses on the cognitive psychology of decision-making and on exciting recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of decision-making, including the new field of neuroeconomics.
    • PSY-P 456 Reproductive Neuroscience (3 cr.).
      P: P346 with a grade of B or higher. R: A biology course at the 300-400 level. Recent and historical literature in the field of reproductive neuroscience. Includes information about sexual differentiation of the brain during development and puberty, sexual differentiation of the neurophysiology of the reproductive tract, decision making in sexual context, and human studies of sexuality. Develops skills to critically evaluate basic scientific literature and develop presentations.
    • PSY-P 457 Topics in Psychology (1-3 cr.). 
      Any topic with P346 or P326 as a prerequisite will count as an Advanced Neuroscience course (1-3 cr.) P: Prerequisites vary according to the topics offered and are specified in the Schedule of Classes each term. Studies in special topics not ordinarily covered in other departmental courses. Topics vary with instructor and semester. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 12 credit hours.
    • PSY-P 466 Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology (3 cr.) CASE N&M.
      P: P326 or P346. Introduction to the cellular and molecular processes that give the nervous system its unique character. Covers the cell biology of neurons and glia and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Examines the genetic and molecular approaches to the biological basis for higher brain functions such as learning and memory.
    • PSY-P 467 Diseases of the Nervous System (3 cr.).
      P: P346 and P466. Provides insights into some of the diseases that affect the nervous system from a cellular and molecular perspective. Studies the pathological processes affecting neurons and glia that underlie their malfunction or death. Explores in depth some neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and dementia. Also explores experimental approaches to uncover the molecular basis of some of the diseases.
    • PSY-P 469 Stress Effects on Brain and Behavior (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. This seminar examines the neurobiology of stress effects on cognition, psychopathology, and health, from the cellular to the systems level. Through readings from primary literature, discussions, and lectures, students will develop a base of knowledge and think critically about the neural and behavioral effects of stress.
    • PSY-P 470 Molecular Methods in Neuroscience Research (3 cr.).
      P: P326 or P346. In-depth discussion of primary research papers used to introduce neuroscience-oriented students to classical and contemporary techniques used in cellular and molecular research. 
    • BIOL-L 410 Brain Behavior and Evolution.
    • PHYS-P 317.Signals and Information Processing in Living Systems
  • Neuroscience Laboratory Courses

    Neuroscience majors must complete one laboratory course: Select one from PSY-P426, PSY-P 433, PSY-P 472, PSY-P473, or an approved neuroscience laboratory using an appropriate departmental research course for enrollment such as: PSY-X 498, PSY-X 499, PSY-P 499, BIOL-L 490, CHEM-C 409, PHYS-S 406, SPHS-S 480.

    • PSY-P 426 Laboratory in Behavioral Neuroscience (3 cr.).
      P: P155, or P151 and P152, or P101 and P102, or P106; P211; K300 or K310; and P326 or P346. Experiments with and demonstrations of contemporary approaches in behavioral neuroscience.
    • PSY-P 433 Laboratory in Neuroimaging Methods (3 cr.).
      P: P211 or P106; P326 or P346; K300 or acceptable substitute. Laboratory experience in all facets of a neuroimaging experiment, including experimental design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, and data presentation. Introductory magnetic resonance (MR) physics and the physiology of blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) changes are included. 
    • PSY-P 472 Laboratory in Brain Electrical Activity (3 cr.).
      P: K300 and P346. Surveys the principles/practice of human brain electrical activity recording techniques used in research and in the clinic, including electroencephalography (EEG) and event related potentials (ERPs). Primarily hands-on lab learning, small group recording practice and subsequent data analysis, supplemented by lectures, seminars, discussions and demonstrations.
    • PSY-P 473 Laboratory in Molecular Neuroscience (3 cr.).
      P: P346 or consent of instructor. Laboratory course designed to provide the advanced undergraduate with training in molecular techniques useful for studying the nervous system. Techniques will include PCR, subcloning, bacterial transformation, mammalian cell transfection, working with fluorescent proteins, RNA interference, Western blotting and sectioning/staining brain tissues.
    • PSY-X 498 Capstone Supervised Research (2-3 cr.).
      P: X497 or P493 and permission of supervising instructor. R: PSY-X397 or PSY-X398. The capstone experience is a series of supervised research courses that require active participation in research in a single lab. Course requires a research plan and progress reports. Counts toward Neuroscience lab credit in approved labs. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours in X498 and P494. I Sem., II Sem.
    • PSY-P 499 Honors Thesis Research (1-12 cr.; max. 12 cr.).
      P: Approval of departmental honors committee. May be substituted for advanced laboratory requirement or, given the permission of the departmental honors committee, for certain other requirements in the program for majors. See Honors Degree in Psychology or Neuroscience.